Western Greenfinch - Carduelis chloris

The European greenfinch, or just greenfinch (Chloris chloris) is a small passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae. This bird is widespread throughout Europe, north Africa and south west Asia. It is mainly resident, but some northernmost populations migrate further south. The greenfinch has also been introduced into both Australiaand New Zealand. In Malta it is considered a prestigious song bird which has been trapped for many years. It has been domesticated and many Maltese people breed them. Chloris is from the Greek Khloros meaning "green" or "yellowish-green". Antonio Arnaiz-Villena et al. (1998) and Antonio Arnaiz-Villena et al. (2006) studied the Eurasian Bullfinch phylogeny. The greenfinch is 15 cm long with a wing span of 24.5 to 27.5 cm. It is similar in size and shape to a house sparrow, but is mainly green, with yellow in the wings and tail. The female and young birds are duller and have brown tones on the back. The bill is thick and conical. The song contains a lot of trilling twitters interspersed with wheezes, and the male has a "butterfly" display flight. Woodland edges, farmland hedges and gardens with relatively thick vegetation are favoured for breeding. It nests in trees or bushes, laying 3 to 6 Eggs. This species can form large flocks outside the breeding season, sometimes mixing with other finches and buntings. They feed largely on seeds, but also take berries. Breeding season occurs in spring, starting in the second half of March, until June, with fledging young in early July. Incubation lasts about 13-14days, by female. Male feeds her at nest during this period. Chicks are covered with thick, long, greyish-white down at hatching. They are fed on insect larvae by both adults during the first days, and later, by frequent regurgitated yellowish past of seeds. They leave the nest about 13 days later but they are not able to fly. Usually, they fledge 16–18 days after hatching. This species produces two or three broods per year. source wikipedia

Belichtingsmodus: Automatische belichting
Belichtingsmethode: Diafragmaprioriteit
Belichtingsduur: 1/50
Bestandsbron: DSC
Flits: Geen flits
ƒ-stop: 6,3
Scherptediepte: 500
Scherptediepte 35-mm film: 750
Versterkingsregeling: Lage versterking omhoog
ISO-snelheid: 800
Lensmodel: 150.0-500.0 mm f/5.0-6.3
Lensspecificatie: 150, 500, 5, 6.3

Belichtingsmodus: Automatische belichting
Belichtingsmethode: Diafragmaprioriteit
Belichtingsduur: 1/1250
Bestandsbron: DSC
Flits: Geen flits
ƒ-stop: 6,3
Scherptediepte: 500
Scherptediepte 35-mm film: 750
Versterkingsregeling: Lage versterking omhoog
ISO-snelheid: 500
Lensmodel: 150.0-500.0 mm f/5.0-6.3
Lensspecificatie: 150, 500, 5, 6.3 

Belichtingsmodus: Automatische belichting
Belichtingsmethode: Diafragmaprioriteit
Belichtingsduur: 1/125
Bestandsbron: DSC
Flits: Geen flits
ƒ-stop: 6,3
Scherptediepte: 500
Scherptediepte 35-mm film: 750
Versterkingsregeling: Lage versterking omhoog
ISO-snelheid: 800
Lensmodel: 150.0-500.0 mm f/5.0-6.3
Lensspecificatie: 150, 500, 5, 6.3 

Belichtingsmodus: Automatische belichting
Belichtingsmethode: Diafragmaprioriteit
Belichtingsduur: 1/160
Bestandsbron: DSC
Flits: Geen flits
ƒ-stop: 6,3
Scherptediepte: 500
Scherptediepte 35-mm film: 750
Versterkingsregeling: Lage versterking omhoog
ISO-snelheid: 800
Lensmodel: 150.0-500.0 mm f/5.0-6.3
Lensspecificatie: 150, 500, 5, 6.3

Belichtingsmodus: Automatische belichting
Belichtingsmethode: Diafragmaprioriteit
Belichtingsduur: 1/640
Bestandsbron: DSC
Flits: Geen flits
ƒ-stop: 6,3
Scherptediepte: 380
Scherptediepte 35-mm film: 570
Versterkingsregeling: Lage versterking omhoog
ISO-snelheid: 500
Lensmodel: 150.0-500.0 mm f/5.0-6.3
Lensspecificatie: 150, 500, 5, 6.3 

Belichtingsmodus: Automatische belichting
Belichtingsmethode: Diafragmaprioriteit
Belichtingsduur: 1/640
Bestandsbron: DSC
Flits: Geen flits
ƒ-stop: 6,3
Scherptediepte: 450
Scherptediepte 35-mm film: 675
Versterkingsregeling: Lage versterking omhoog
ISO-snelheid: 500
Lensmodel: 150.0-500.0 mm f/5.0-6.3
Lensspecificatie: 150, 500, 5, 6.3

 

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